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 The most important night in Hollywood is still a few days away, but three stars had their big red carpet moment at the 2012 Brit Awards in London Tuesday night.


Rihanna rocked her third plunging look since the Grammys, stepping out in a dazzling gold beaded Givenchy Haute Couture by Riccardo Tisci halter gown with slits up the front and back. The “We Found Love” singer, 24, accessorized with leather opera-length gloves and embellished heels.


PHOTOS: Rihanna’s daring style


Former X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger, 33, wore her most gorgeous look ever: a lemon-colored strapless Versace gown with gold studded details, strappy platform heels and gold dangly earrings.


PHOTOS: What the stars wore at the 2012 Grammys


British singer Jessie J., 23, who also turned heads at the Grammys in a figure-hugging silver Julian Macdonald bustier design, wowed in a red sheer Falguni & Shane Peacock gown with strategically placed floral embroidery and red undies. She rocked dramatic smoky eyes and bold black nails.


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Rihanna-LondonAfter winning the International Female artist award at last night’s BRIT Awards, Rihanna decided to hit the town to celebrate. The “Birthday Cake” singer slipped into a yellow dress with a twisted bow detail at the waist and partied at London nightclub Mahiki. She paired her neon look with funky sunglasses, patent blue heels and ankle socks.

Rihanna finally left the club around 4AM — and appeared to have a red mark on her neck. Perhaps it is a love bite from a male admirer.


Earlier in the evening, Rihanna gave a show-stopping performance of her hit “We Found Love” at the 2012 BRIT Awards. Watch her belt the tune below:

Rihanna, Chris Brown Collaboration Sparks Outrage
The man who bloodied and bruised Rihanna three years ago can now be heard on the pop princess’ sexually charged “Birthday Cake” remix, released Monday. Chris Brown raps about wanting to “f***” her and “give it to her in the worst …

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2/22/2012 5:38 PM ET
(RTTNews) – Rihanna, Bruno Mars and Adele were among the biggest winners at the Brit Awards, which took place on Tuesday, February 22 at London’s O2 Arena.


Riri took home the Award for International Female Solo Artist, a category that included competition from Beyonce and Lady Gaga. She thanked her fans:


“When I feel misunderstood my fans always remind me that it’s okay to be myself.”


Bruno Mars nabbed the masculine complement to Rihanna’s award, the International Male Solo Artist Award.


Finally, Adele took home two awards: Female Solo Artist and Album of the Year. She said the win was the perfect match to her recent Grammy sweep:


“Nothing makes me prouder than coming home with six Grammys and then coming to the BRITs and winning album of the year.”


by RTT Staff Writer


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You are here: Home / Blog/blogging / Karrueche wants Chris Brown and Rihanna to know that…

Poor Karrueche Tran. The aspiring model got herself mixed up with a narcissist who is now creeping with other women whose F.A.M.E. can boost his failing career. Sound familiar? I tried to warn Karrueche through her closest friends, but she wouldn’t listen to them. Now they say she’s depressed and taking sedatives to mask her pain, so she can sleep at night.

Chris jetted Karrueche to Miami for Valentine’s Day — the same day he was seen creeping with Lil Wayne’s baby mama, Sarah ViVan, who flew to Los Angeles from Atlanta to “hang out” with CB.

Now Karrueche is the laughing stock of the industry after Rihanna took Chris Brown back — and totally disrespect his lover on her “Birthday Cake” remix. Sources say Rihanna made CB disrespect Karrueche to force him to prove his love to her — and CB didn’t hesitate.

Narcissists like Rihanna and Chris don’t have feelings or empathy for others. They are the center of the universe and no one else matters to them. They want what they want, and if you get in their way, you get run over. They don’t understand when they cause pain and suffering in others. They only understand when someone causes them pain.

Photo: INFphoto.com

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by Jason Lipshutz, N.Y.  |   February 22, 2012 4:00 EST

Commemorating her 24th birthday with a rash of widespread controversy, Rihanna finally unveiled her “Birthday Cake” remix, featuring Chris Brown, online on Monday night (Feb. 20), just as Brown simultaneously released his “Turn Up The Music” remix featuring his former flame. Although some ( including Billboard.com) have questioned Rih and Breezy’s decision to musically reunite three years after getting into a violent altercation before the 2009 Grammy Awards, production maestro The-Dream, who helmed Rihanna’s “Birthday Cake” remix, doesn’t believe that the collaborations should be judged against the former couple’s unseemly past.

“For me, it’s just music — two talented people doing a record together, doing two records together, and that’s what it was,” The-Dream (real name: Terius Nash) tells Billboard.com. “It wasn’t about an incident that happened. The true thing really is to forgive, and… you want to believe in people.”

Listen To Both Rihanna/Chris Brown Remixes

The-Dream — who is currently readying his own album, “The Love IV: Diary of a Mad Man” — says that the “Cake” remix was finished barely a week ago, after a 78-second version of the song appeared on Rihanna’s sixth studio album, “Talk That Talk,” in November.

“It was Rih’s idea,” says the producer. “Not only do we work together, but [Rihanna] is a friend of mine. And it’s like, ‘You wanna do something? Then cool, let’s do it.’ I don’t know how she got the logistics and how it happened — maybe she’ll talk about it one day. I showed up at the studio, and it was like, ‘All right, cool, let’s finish this record,’ which we probably should have finished the first time we did it.”

An Open Letter To Rihanna | An Open Letter To Chris Brown

Before the release of “Birthday Cake (Remix)” and “Turn Up The Music (Remix),” Rihanna proclaimed on Twitter, “I’m so solid as a rock, they just can’t stop me now!” As the pop superstar’s friend and longtime collaborator, The-Dream says that Rihanna’s fans should accept her collaboration with Brown as a positive example of forgiveness.   

“I think [the topic] that should be more on the tongues is: how do we proclaim to be a nation of forgiving, and we go by all of these rules and everything, but we can’t actually do it?” he says. “It actually makes you look weaker than your adversary — if you don’t have the power to forgive, but you lie and say that you did.

“Because this is about her,” The-Dream continues, of Rihanna. “If she can forgive, that’s where she is mentally. As a friend, it’s like, ‘Okay, cool. Let’s roll.'”

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RihannaPerformer Rihanna arrives for the Brit Awards 2012 at the O2 Arena in London, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Jonathan Short)

MESFIN FEKADU
Associated Press


NEW YORK (AP) — Rihanna is known for making bold statements, from her often sexually charged music to her tattoos to even the hue of her hair.


But her latest decision — a musical pairing with the man who three years ago left her bloodied and bruised — has left some questioning her judgment.


On Monday, after days of teasing, Rihanna and Chris Brown debuted two songs featuring each other. Brown sings and raps on the remix of Rihanna’s sexually charged song “Birthday Cake,” and she appears on a new version of his upbeat tune “Turn up the Music.”


Fans have been split about the topic: Some support Rihanna and Brown’s collaborations, others condemn it. The topic was still trending on Twitter on late Tuesday, with plenty of tweets criticizing Rihanna for embracing her former abuser.


Rihanna seemed to address the controversy Tuesday when she won best international female artist at the Brit Awards.


“At times when I feel misunderstood, my fans always remind me that it’s OK to be myself,” Rihanna said.


But Bill Werde, editorial director of the music trade publication Billboard, says Rihanna’s decision to make music with Brown could disappoint some of her supporters.


“I think there are people out there that feel betrayed (by) Rihanna,” he said. “She has every right to be an individual … she has every right to date who she wants to date and be with whoever she wants to be with. She’s a grown woman. But you just need to recognize that then the fans have every right to feel how they’re going to feel about that.”


Emails to both Brown and Rihanna’s record labels asking for more information on the songs went unreturned Tuesday, and while Rihanna’s representative had no comment, Brown’s publicist did not return a request for comment.


When rumors about the collaboration sparked last week, both stoked the talk about it. Brown tweeted: “Let them be mad!!!! We make music. Don’t like it, don’t listen!” On Tuesday, after weighing some of the negative feedback, he tweeted: “You are not GODS to judge us. U have no say! Positivity & LOVE! My fans make a difference.”


The release of the songs comes three years after Brown attacked his then-girlfriend on the eve of the Grammys, leaving her with a split lip, a black eye and other injuries.


Later that year, when she addressed the assault in an interview with ABC, she went into detail about how Brown punched and bit her during an argument that turned violent. She said Brown had “no soul in his eyes” and she had no idea how the beating would end. She also warned other women facing domestic violence to not let themselves become blinded by love.


“I think the existence of these (songs) show that she’s still kind of struggling with that, as many humans would,” said Werde.


Sandra Ramos, who founded the women’s shelter Strengthen Our Sisters in 1970, says she hasn’t seen many abusers change, and that victims — like Rihanna — get “caught up in this cycle.”


“She should be working on herself and not allowing herself to be near her addiction, her temptation, who’s this guy that purports to be charming when he is a batterer,” Ramos said. “He could have killed her.”


After Brown pleaded guilty to a felony charge, he saw his career plummet: A former Billboard artist of the year, he lost endorsements and his third album, “Graffiti,” released 10 months after his attack, was a commercial disappointment. A restraining order prevented him from being close to Rihanna and he was put on probation (which remains in effect). Since then, he’s returned to the top of the music charts, releasing a slew of hit songs and the album “F.A.M.E. (Forgiving All My Enemies),” which won him his first Grammy this month. He also made his physical return to the Grammys, the same night Rihanna performed (the restraining order is no longer in effect). Brown performed twice at the show, which drew criticism.


But now Rihanna may face criticism as well. Werde, who expects the songs to find success, says he doesn’t believe she’ll lose any of her endorsements, but adds that image could change.


“This will be white-hot for a few minutes in the big scheme of things and then it will die down. But what’s going to be left behind is the complicated residue of who Rihanna is as a role model,” he said.


Even before the songs were officially released, Billboard addressed the matter in open letters to Rihanna and Brown. In Rihanna’s letter, Billboard said her pairing with Brown was “not cool, to a whole lot of people.”


“Young girls look up to people like you to guide them through circumstances too complex for them to tackle on their own, and by granting Chris Brown an iota of tolerance, you implicitly encourage others to consider doing the same,” the letter read. “‘With great power comes great responsibility’ is a schmaltzy sentiment, but it’s fitting here — like it or not, you have a different level of power than most of us schmoes because of your pop superstardom, and a different level of responsibility in your personal life than in your music because of the tabloid-infected culture we live in. It’s a burden that is not fair to you, or anyone in pop culture, but it’s one you have to accept.”


Rihanna is currently a spokeswoman for Nivea, and has endorsed CoverGirl and Gucci in the past. In November, she said in an interview on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” that her goal is to be her true self, and not necessarily a role model to others.


“I used to worry about it a lot, but then I realized the message I really want to send is not perfection, it’s individuality,” she said.


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By now, you’ve already heard what fans and a domestic-abuse expert had to say about Rihanna and Chris Brown’s controversial collaborations on new remixes of “Birthday Cake” and “Turn Up the Music.” Chances are, you’ve probably formed your own opinion too.

But as the initial shock of the pair’s reunion subsides, and both remixes begin to diffuse into the collective conscience, we’re left with one rather important question: Beyond all the (very public) handwringing the songs have created, are they actually any good? Early opinions from critics have been lukewarm at best (and downright hostile at worst), mostly because it seems they have a difficult time separating their feelings about Brown — and his 2009 assault of Rihanna — from their feelings about the songs themselves. And really, you can’t blame them. In a lot of ways, it’s impossible not to view the “Cake” and “Music” remixes through the prism of the past three years.

Still, with opinions still being formed (and feelings still fresh), we reached out to some of our favorite music journos to get their take on the songs and Rihanna and Brown’s unlikely collaboration. Here’s what they had to say:

” ‘Birthday Cake’ was pretty much destined to be a smash when Talk That Talk was released with only a snippet of it. … The 78-second bit of The-Dream-produced track inspired hosannas from members of the Rihanna Navy who couldn’t wait for the full thing to be released. … Putting Chris Brown on the [remix] (and having him sing ‘I wanna f— you right now,’ which Rihanna sang on the fade-out of the TTT version, as his opening gambit) seems almost like overplaying her hand. Like, this song was going to be a big deal to her fans no matter what, so why add the controversy to it? Then again, the past three years of her career have, it seems, been about her taking control of her public image in a big way — from enacting revenge fantasies in ‘Man Down’ to singing about sex a lot — and adding Brown to a song about fetishistic sex is a way for her to do just that, to implicitly flip off people who she sees as paternalistic or overbearing while engaging in what she calls ‘chiefin’.’ Every gossip item about the two of them getting back together or hanging out, every angry/sad/exulting blog post, every public tweet they direct to one another when presumably they could just DM back and forth, keeps them — and the songs — in the news. Meanwhile, Brown’s song and Rihanna’s contribution to it are both pretty bland, a ‘Party Rock Anthem’ with no shuffling and even less whimsy. At one point, Rihanna does the phrase ‘I love you,’ which will no doubt get tongues wagging. I am pretty much grossed out by the whole thing, to be honest.” — Maura Johnston, Village Voice

“The remixes aren’t terrible, and that’s as much as I’ll say at risk of saying something positive about Chris Brown. … The most important thing to remember is that if you have a problem with these two teaming up: Don’t blame Rihanna. Blame the ravenous, unscrupulous, money-starved record industry for being complacent through this entire event. The whole machine is falling apart, so everyone — artists like Ludacris and Justin Bieber, their labels and managers, magazines like Vibe who put Chris Brown on the cover, awards shows like the Grammys, TV networks who play Chris Brown videos — they’re all too afraid to potentially put forth an opinion that would prevent them from being where money is. The fact that everyone except Jay-Z and Miranda Lambert is too chickensh– to speak out against woman-beating is pathetic beyond pathetic. Everyone is too scared to compromise their chance to catch the last remaining dollars during the music industry’s death rattle.” — Christopher R. Weingarten, SPIN

“Rihanna’s ‘Birthday Cake’ was a standout track from Talk That Talk, even in its original form (as an interlude) — and more importantly, without Chris Brown. On the remix, all Brown’s aggressive, salacious verses do … is add fuel to rumors circling of their reunion behind closed doors. [And] Rihanna comes back on the song, calling checkmate on Breezy with her suggestive lyrics — “Remember how you did it?/ Remember how you fit it?/ If you still want to kiss it, come, come and get it” — making it hard to not be teased into again reading between the lines. ‘Turn Up the Music’ feels like a collaboration that would have fit both artists’ discography during their days coupled up. Although RiRi’s airy vocals blend well with the Underdogs’ dance soundscapes, adding Rihanna to the track doesn’t leave a lasting impression nor elevate the song to higher grounds. Ultimately, it’s not the content of the songs that matter; it’s the statement both singers are trying to make by simply releasing them. The collaborations appear to be a step toward reconciliation between both — seeing the tracks climb the chart is a bonus. Rihanna wants us to know that she no longer wears the shoes of the victim and Breezy wants to prove that he’s become a better man. This isn’t a personal or professional move; it’s both. Both singers have woven their personal life, a haunting moment in their lives, into a professional move. Though it’s stirred much controversy, I believe it was bound to happen.” — Erika Ramirez, Billboard.com’s “The Juice”

What do you think of the collaborations? Let us know in the comments.

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